Category Archives: Hiking

All a Matter of Perspective

I hike. On one of my favorite walks, along the Buckeye Trail in Hinckley Reservation, the path skirts the edge of a field adjacent to woods. Usually there is a cairn (man-made pile of rocks) there. For the first 6 months, the cairn was unchanging, but then – it had been knocked down. I was sad.

The rocks remained.

I don’t remember if we started to rebuild the cairn, or if someone else did. But it did reappear. Now we and other unseen hikers add rocks and sometimes wood or nutshells. My perspective about the tumbled carin changed and I look forward to see the latest configuration. Here is a recent one:

Cairn in Hinckley

Cairn in Hinckley

Speaking of perspective, when I step back – waaay back – here is what it really looks like.

Cairn in Hinckley

Cairn in Hinckley

Rosemarie Hanus makes beads, but not rock cairns in her home studio.  See these beads at EtsyArt Fire, or her Spawn of Flame website.

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The Ice Stopped Here

There are many ledges in Northeast Ohio thanks to ancient glaciers. They pushed rocks along as they moved; when they melted, the rocks remained. We took advantage of freakish warm weather here in our January winter and hiked the local Top O Ledges, part of Hinckley Reservation.

The Ice Stopped Here

The Ice Stopped Here

The dog was quite happy. He has spied… something.

I Spy with My Little Eyes

I Spy with My Little Eyes

Here is another gratuitous ledge photo.

Overlooking a Ledge

Overlooking a Ledge

 


Oak Hill Trail

Recently revisited a trail that we haven’t been on in years. It’s in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and is in the Oak Hill Day Use area. The inner trail is an easy trail, only 1.8 miles and an elevation change of 50 feet. It interweaves with another, more difficult trail called the Plateau Trail (4.9 miles, 200 feet elevation change.)

We did a little of both. Our first loop on the Plateau Trail took us to Meadowedge Pond. You can see where the pond used to end – where the tall grasses are. Somebody (beavers, likely) built a new little dam, extending the pond a little. You can see just a little of the dam in the lower right corner of the photo.

Meadowedge Pond, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Meadowedge Pond, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Although it is not a challenging trail, it has many beautiful passages – such as this little footbridge over a tiny ravine.

Footbridge on the Oak Hill Trail, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Footbridge on the Oak Hill Trail, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Check out this fallen tree – suspended in the air.

Good Catch

Good Catch

I am looking forward to going back and exploring more of the Plateau loops.


Jack-in-the-Pulpit

I haven’t seen very many Jack-in-the-Pulpits yet this year, but her are a couple.  The first one, seen in late April, was on the small side- only about 6 inches high, but beautiful anyway.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Now, in the second week of May, there are more!  There are two in the picture below.  Can you find them both?

Jack-In-The-Pulpit

Jack-In-The-Pulpit

Seen in Hinckley Reservation.


Trillium

I think that the trillium is one of our more showy wildflowers here in Northeast Ohio. On a recent hike in Hinckley Reservation, there were parts of the trail where there were blooming trillium as far as I could see in the deep woods.

Trillium Everywhere!

Trillium Everywhere!

There were many different kinds; I am only able to differentiate them by color.  White is the most common here.

Trillium

Trillium

When the white ones are near the end of their blooming time, they turn a pretty pink.

Trillium Turning Pink

Trillium Turning Pink

There were just a tiny few of some creamy green ones, but my photos just look white, so you will just have to image those.  Check out these vivid red ones though!  Wow.  This isn’t a Photoshop trick.

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

From the Wikipedia, “trillium was treated in the family Trilliaceae or Trillium family, a part of the Liliales or Lily order. The AGP II treats Trilliaceae as a synonym of the family Melanthiaceae.”  I’m not sure what that means.  Is it a lily or not?

Some interesting fact I saw while researching these plants – ants spread the seeds of trillium.  Also – the large white trillium is the official wildflower of Ohio.


Squirrel Corn

Here are the elusive Squirrel Corn that we found in Hinckley Reservation.  The flowers resemble a kernel of corn.  I find these along with the Dutchman’s Breeches; these were in a lowland area in deep woods, by a creek.

Squirrel Corn

Squirrel Corn

Squirrel Corn

Squirrel Corn

I love our local plants!


Dutchman’s Breeches

Dutchman’s Breeches and Squirrel Corn are both wildflowers that can be seen here in Northeast Ohio.  I don’t know if is where we hike, but I more often see the Dutchman’s Breeches. Here are some, seen in Hinckley Reservation. (of course!)

The Dutchman’s Breeches, with a little imagination look like little pairs of pants – upside down with the legs pointing up, but still pants (or breeches).  My Grandfather used to say it “britches”… like “hold on to your britches”, ummm, but that is quite the tangent isn’t it?  Aren’t they adorable?

Duchman's Breeches

Dutchman's Breeches

Duchman's Breeches

Dutchman's Breeches

Up next – Squirrel Corn.