Category Archives: Dogs

The Ice Stopped Here

There are many ledges in Northeast Ohio thanks to ancient glaciers. They pushed rocks along as they moved; when they melted, the rocks remained. We took advantage of freakish warm weather here in our January winter and hiked the local Top O Ledges, part of Hinckley Reservation.

The Ice Stopped Here

The Ice Stopped Here

The dog was quite happy. He has spied… something.

I Spy with My Little Eyes

I Spy with My Little Eyes

Here is another gratuitous ledge photo.

Overlooking a Ledge

Overlooking a Ledge

 


Weekly Photo Challenge: Old

Happy Birthday Spike!

Here is my old dog – her “birthday” is April 15 and she is 14 years old.  We really don’t know her birthday since she came to us as a very young (and tiny) rescue dog; we assigned the date and have celebrated it each year.

When I found that the weekly photo challenge topic was Old, I immediately thought that I had to use her as the subject. She was less than cooperative, but at least I captured a couple of pictures that were not of her back end.  That is what I usually get!

Spike - 14 Years!

Spike - Always on the Move


Rainy New Year’s Day

The temperature had warmed and much of the snow and ice had melted, so it seemed like a great day for a walk.  Along with some moody fog, there was a fine mist of rain; but hey, it was only a fine mist… until 2 minutes into the walk.

image

I was attempting to frame this photo of Hinckley Reservoir when the heavens opened and poured rain upon us.  I quickly snapped it and put the poor camera away.  I love how it turned out!

It only poured for about 2 minutes and then settled back into the gentle mist for the remainder of the walk.  Our timing could not have been worse!

Spike doesn’t mind the wetness, but apparently Genghis Khan (who has been remoikered Dinkus) is not so fond of it.  He was almost constantly shaking the water off.
image


Blue Hen Falls and Buttermilk Falls

We went on a hike today – one which we have not done for a long time – to see two waterfalls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.   It is a very short hike to the first waterfalls, Blue Hen Falls and another mile to the second, Buttermilk Falls.

Blue Hen Falls is about 15 feet high; here is a view from the top.

Blue Hen Falls

Blue Hen Falls, Northeast Ohio

The trail was not quite what I remembered.  We had to cross the stream 3 times, I thought that only used to be once.  At one point, there was a lot of erosion, leaving the trail right at the edge of a drop off.  We decided to take an alternate path around that!

I took lots of pictures of mushrooms; I was bending over when Paul noticed some friends right next to us. This nest was right at my eye level; we were wondering how we did not bump into it! I don’t know if they were wasps or hornets…  We quickly left the area.

Wasp Nest

Wasp Nest

Here is Buttermilk Falls.  It is very secluded and is about 20 feet high.  At my last visit, there was a small pool at the base of the falls, but erosion has filled that.  It was very much worth the walk.  Well, except maybe for the off trail jaunt that we had to do.

Buttermilk Falls

Buttermilk Falls, Northeast Ohio

Spike loved the experience.  She jumped into the water with exuberance!

Spike at Buttermilk Falls

Spike at Buttermilk Falls


First Day of School 2009 – 2010

It’s that time of year!  Here are the “traditional” photos of everybody in front of the linden tree.  When I was little, I had my photo taken in front of a huge maple tree each year; I used that tree for my kids until we moved in 1997.

I

First Day of School 2009 - 2010

First Day of School 2009 - 2010

I wasn’t able to get the cat and the dog in the same picture… well, at least before the bus came.

First Day of School 2009 - 2010

First Day of School 2009 - 2010


Randers Pride – Heirloom Daylilies

Over the weekend, we bought some day lilies today from Heritage Farms in Peninsula, Ohio.

Gazebo at Heritage Farm

Gazebo at Heritage Farm

These extra special flowers are called Randers Pride. My family bred lilies up until the late 1950’s. This flower was named after my maternal grandfather, who’s surname was Randers; I believe that he was the one that developed the flower.  It was registered by Libis-Cheetham. Libis was my maternal grandmother’s maiden name, so that would be my great grandfather, but unfortunately, I do not know who Cheetham was. This flower is extra special to me because it was registered in 1957 – the year that I was born. It helps that it is a quite tall plant with beautiful large yellow flowers.

Randers Pride Daylily

Randers Pride Daylily

Here are the three Randers Pride plants nestled into their new home, along with 2 friends named My Kia.  You didn’t think that I could possibly only buy what I went to purchase, did you?  My Kia was described as “quite prolific with red flowers”.  Oh, the human is my daughter, Katie.

Katie with Lilies

Katie with Lilies

Spike, the dog, thought that she was quite camouflaged while hiding behind the bee-balm. She was a good helper too.

Spike, the Camo-Dog

Spike, the Camo-Dog


Making Dirty Laundry

My dog Spike tries to pretend that my cat Opel does not exist.  Despite that, the cat adores the dog.  What they have in common is this: they share an intense love for clean laundry.  Here they repose on some laundry that was clean before they found it, but is now dirty laundry.

Cat - Dog on Newly Dirty Laundry

Cat - Dog on Newly Dirty Laundry


Thanksgiving Hike

Doesn’t everybody go hiking in the snow on Thanksgiving? Katie and I took Spike for a walk at Hinckley Lake.  Here she is, in the car, anticipating the walk.

Spike Anticipating a Walk

Spike Anticipating a Walk

Arriving at Hinkley Reservation

Arriving at Hinkley Reservation

Surprisingly there were quite a few people hiking or running.  One gentleman running by gleefully commented on what a glorious day that it was.  It was indeed a beautiful day, starting out a little overcast …

Thanksgiving at Hinckley Reservation

Thanksgiving at Hinckley Reservation

Thanksgiving Hink at Hinckley Reservation

Thanksgiving Hike at Hinckley Reservation

and ending with the sky clear and the sun out.

Blue Sky in Northeast Ohio

Blue Sky in Northeast Ohio

Read another series about hiking and walking the dog at Hinckley Reservation starting here.


Walking the Dog – Chapter 5 – the Boathouse

On this particular hike, we walked the dog completely around Hinckley Lake, as I said before, it is about a 3.5 mile trail. Near the southern part of the lake is an area that we don’t usually walk past – the boathouse. This is not because I have a problem with the boathouse, but because it is usually quite busy in the summer season. This doesn’t really make sense, since I don’t mind walking around the spillway when it is busy.

Boathouse at Hinckley Lake

Boathouse at Hinckley Lake

From the Cleveland Metroparks website:

The Hinckley Lake boathouse is open from April until mid-October. The boathouse features boat rentals, fishing tackle, bait and snacks.

Snacks? Yum! All summer long, my daughter had been asking about renting a canoe and spending some time on the lake instead of just looking at the lake. I thought that this was a good idea, but we just never got to it. On this day, we checked to see if they were open (having not read the website first), but alas it is past mid-October, isn’t it? I am wistful about our non-boating expedition.

I wonder if they rent those doggy life jackets too? I’ve seen them for sale. If I were to wager on it, I bet that they don’t allow pets to accompany us novice boaters.

When I am not not-boating, I make beads. Check them out at Etsy or my Spawn of Flame website.


Walking the Dog – Chapter 4 – Sign of Unwelcome Plants

I compulsively read everything that I see. I can read fast, I can read upside down, and I can read mirror image. If there is something on your desk, you’d better put it away if I shouldn’t see it, because I’ll read it whether I want to or not. How could I possibly ignore all of the compelling signs along a trail? Especially if it about the ubiquitous Poison Ivy.

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy

“Leaves of three, let it be”.  How many times have you heard that?   I guess that the “welcomeness” of this plant depends upon your point of view, so perhaps my title is unfair. I’ve read that it is a source of food for birds, so they must welcome it. Many people however, develop contact dermatitis reaction to the oils – you know, a nasty rash. I don’t (yet), but everyone else in my family does.

This plant is rampant around the Hinckley Reservation, including one picnic area with an island of gorgeous ground cover that on closer observation, appears to be Poison Ivy. Maybe it is not and is some similar plant, but I pay careful attention to not let the dog brush against it and transfer the oils to us.

Are you getting itchy just thinking about it?  I am, and like I said, I’ve never had so much as one blister (yet) from it.

When I am not hiking or scratching, I make beads. Check them out at Etsy or my Spawn of Flame website.