Tag Archives: Hinckley Reservation

All a Matter of Perspective

I hike. On one of my favorite walks, along the Buckeye Trail in Hinckley Reservation, the path skirts the edge of a field adjacent to woods. Usually there is a cairn (man-made pile of rocks) there. For the first 6 months, the cairn was unchanging, but then – it had been knocked down. I was sad.

The rocks remained.

I don’t remember if we started to rebuild the cairn, or if someone else did. But it did reappear. Now we and other unseen hikers add rocks and sometimes wood or nutshells. My perspective about the tumbled carin changed and I look forward to see the latest configuration. Here is a recent one:

Cairn in Hinckley

Cairn in Hinckley

Speaking of perspective, when I step back – waaay back – here is what it really looks like.

Cairn in Hinckley

Cairn in Hinckley

Rosemarie Hanus makes beads, but not rock cairns in her home studio.  See these beads at EtsyArt Fire, or her Spawn of Flame website.


Jack-in-the-Pulpit

I haven’t seen very many Jack-in-the-Pulpits yet this year, but her are a couple.  The first one, seen in late April, was on the small side- only about 6 inches high, but beautiful anyway.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Now, in the second week of May, there are more!  There are two in the picture below.  Can you find them both?

Jack-In-The-Pulpit

Jack-In-The-Pulpit

Seen in Hinckley Reservation.


Trillium

I think that the trillium is one of our more showy wildflowers here in Northeast Ohio. On a recent hike in Hinckley Reservation, there were parts of the trail where there were blooming trillium as far as I could see in the deep woods.

Trillium Everywhere!

Trillium Everywhere!

There were many different kinds; I am only able to differentiate them by color.  White is the most common here.

Trillium

Trillium

When the white ones are near the end of their blooming time, they turn a pretty pink.

Trillium Turning Pink

Trillium Turning Pink

There were just a tiny few of some creamy green ones, but my photos just look white, so you will just have to image those.  Check out these vivid red ones though!  Wow.  This isn’t a Photoshop trick.

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

From the Wikipedia, “trillium was treated in the family Trilliaceae or Trillium family, a part of the Liliales or Lily order. The AGP II treats Trilliaceae as a synonym of the family Melanthiaceae.”  I’m not sure what that means.  Is it a lily or not?

Some interesting fact I saw while researching these plants – ants spread the seeds of trillium.  Also – the large white trillium is the official wildflower of Ohio.


Reminiscing About a Autumn Day in Hinckley

Well, the theme around here this week is looking back over the photos from last year. These were from November, 2010 – the leaves had already fallen, everything was ready for winter. The day itself was crisply cold, but the sun was out and keeping us warm.

This trail is a section of the Hinkley Hills Loop Trail that I wrote about recently.  In contrast to that rugged area, this portion is very flat and meanders through meadows and the edge of the woods.

There were numerous crab apple trees with their vivid red fruits.  They sure stand out from the surrounding gray branches.

Paul and Spike Inspecting a Crab Apple Tree

Crab Apples

Check out the thorns on this Hawthorn tree.  I just read that the Hawthorn is part of the rose family – do all roses have thorns?  Hmmm…

Hawthorn Tree Thorn


Reminiscing About a Summer Day in Hinckley

While sorting photos, I found some shots of one of our many hikes in Hinckley Reservation. last summer.  We have walked there often in the last couple of years, and late last spring we discovered how nice it was to walk the bridle trails.  We frequently encounter the horses and always get the dogs well off to the side and make them sit.

One time, after the they passed, the horses began to run.  This made Spike very excited and she wanted to run after them.  The remainder of the hike, she was very animated and was bouncing all over the place.  It really tired her out and she was a little stiff the next day.

Here is a view of the Hinckley Hills Loop Trail near the Kiwanis trailhead.

Hinckley Hills Loop Trail

Quoting from the trail map:

This rugged trail crosses ravines and streams and follows sections of the Buckeye and bridle trails.

Yep – that describes it.  It’s rugged, and the path is confusing sometimes.  We got lost several times before we were familiar with the area.  We have talked with several other hikers and they mentioned helping out lost hikers at times.  It’s not “deep in the woods” lost, just “how in the world do I get back to where I started” lost.

Here is a photo of a bridle trail loop.  I can’t remember the name, but it was *really* rugged.

Bridle Trail Loop

Rugged!

I remember being excited seeing the start of the leaves turning color.

Fall Approaches

Rosemarie Hanus melts glass to make beads in northeast Ohio.  In her spare time she love to hike the local trails.


So, is it a Frog or a Toad?

I am not sure how to tell the difference between a frog and a toad, but we found this little beast (and a whole army more) on a hike yesterday at Hinckley Reservation.  (A group of frogs is an army or a knot.)

Frog or Toad?

Frog or Toad?

In my limited world, if it was brown, it was a toad.  This cutie is brown, but my best guess is that it is not a toad and is a frog. Here are some frog characteristics from Answers.com:

  • Frogs have finer bodies with narrower waists while toads’ bodies are broader.
  • When on a flat surface, frogs lie flat, but toads tend to sit upright.
  • Frogs have feet which are specially structured to act as suction caps to enable them to climb trees and other surfaces.
  • Frogs have slimy, slippery and delicate skin, but toads have drier skin with warts.
  • Generally, frogs live near water. Toads tend to live away from water.

It was more slender than most toad that I have seen.  It did hug the ground, and the toes seemed to have flat tips.  It didn’t have a warty skin.  It was right next to the reservoir.

Did I mention that it was really tiny?

It IS Tiny

It IS Tiny

So, are you with me?  Is it a frog?

Rosemarie Hanus makes beads in her home studio, but has never made a frog bead.  See these “not frog” beads at EtsyArt Fire, or her Spawn of Flame website.


Just a Walk in the Park

We went on a hike on Friday at the Hinckley Reservation;.  It was what we call a glorious Akron day – overcast, damp, and cool.  This is typical weather here in Northeast Ohio, and I guess that I have learned to appreciate this type of day.

I disturbed a Great Blue Heron.  I must have taken just a little too long for his comfort to frame the shot.  He indignantly flew to the other end of the reservoir.

Aggravated Great Blue Heron

Aggravated Great Blue Heron

The dampness brought many tidbits to my sense of smell.  The woods smelled of freshly decomposing leaves.  It was a clean, earthy smell – quite pleasant and reminds me of why our vegetation is quite lush this time of year.

The air also hung heavy with the scent of wild roses.  They smelled quite sweet right now, but not cloying at all.

Wild Roses

Wild Roses

It was a perfect day.